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Change before you have to.

— Jack Welch

Old Brick House Antiques

Old Brick House
Antiques & Stuff

The slightly unusual single owner shop — at 5858 Route 209 in Kerhonkson — offers an interesting, fun and relaxing shopping experience... Americana, country stuff, glass, ephemera, art, furniture... Something for everyone to enjoy!
Open daily but Wednesday.
oldbrickhouse.com
845-626-5206

Blue Stone Press, November 2, 2012 - page 9

World War II veteran too young to retire

by Nancy Morrish, BSP Reporter

High Falls and Alligerville residents might recognize Clifford Knudsen as the elderly gentleman who works behind the counter at the general store in Alligerville. Knudsen is friendly and animated but very modest. So much so that acquaintances may not know much about Knudsen's past before moving to this area in 1954. Consequently, they may not realize that he served in both World War II and the Korean War, and if they do, they probably don't know some of the terrifying moments Knudsen encountered while serving his country. Why even Knudsen's daughter, Marijane wasn't aware that the ship her father served on during the war had been torpedoed and severely damaged until she attended a Navy reunion in Denver with her parents.

Knudsen was living at home in Rhode Island when he was drafted into WWII at age 21 and enlisted in the Navy. After two weeks at boot camp, he was assigned to the U.S.S. Denver, which was stationed in the South Pacific. Knudsen worked in the boiler room as an Oil King, otherwise known as a petty officer in charge of fuel storage. While on duty, it was his job to pump the correct amount of oil in the boiler room to ensure that the ship was always fueled properly for any situation that might arise. The U.S.S. Denver was a Cruiser and was credited with destructing, or assisting in destructing seven Japanese warships and 14 aircraft. It also took part in 14 shore bombardments, most of which covered amphibious landings.

Shortly after the war began, the Denver endured several near misses and luck was on her side while the crew was offering support at the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay in November 1943 near Bougainville. During heavy fighting, three eight-inch shells hit the ship but miraculously did not explode. But 10 day later on Nov. 13, 1943, her luck ended when an aircraft-launched torpedo badly damaged the ship and killed 20 crewmen.

While describing the events of that perilous night, Knudsen recalls he had just put his head down on his pillow after completing his shift when he heard a loud, "BOOM, BOOM!" He went on to say that the Denver's captain was very stubborn and refused to abandon ship even though the damage was severe. Eventually, the Denver made its way back to California badly listing all the way. Five months later, when repairs to the ship were complete, Knudsen, aboard the Denver once again headed back to the South Pacific where he remained until the war ended in 1945. After Japan's surrender, the Denver remained for a time to support prisoner of war recovery and occupation efforts.

After the end of the war, Knudsen continued working aboard the Denver until it was placed out of commission and in reserve in 1947. Shortly after that, Knudsen was transferred to Florida where he was assigned to one destroyer and then another. He remained in the reserves and though he hoped to see more of the world by being sent to Europe, it was not to be. After being told to report to Brooklyn some time later, Knudsen was assigned to the U.S.S. New Jersey and headed back to the South Pacific. Knudsen worked in the boiler room of the New Jersey during the Korean War and though thankfully it was the last war that Knudsen would serve in, the New Jersey went on to become the most decorated battleship in naval history.

Knudsen and his wife, Joan have been married for over 60 years. They met on a blind date that was arranged by a friend of Joan's. After they were married, they wanted to purchase a home, but couldn't afford one in Brooklyn. Joan had remembered coming to this area when she was younger and so in 1954, they purchased a home in Alligerville and have lived here ever since. The Knudsen's had two sons who both served in the Navy and are now deceased. They have two daughters, Marijane and Eileen, as well as grandchildren and several great-grandchildren who live nearby and the family is very tight-knit. Marijane owns the general store in Alligerville and Clifford and Joan run it for her. Knudsen is almost 92 years young and when asked if he plans to retire anytime soon, he simply replies, "Retire, what's that?"

Knudsen's family is proud of his accomplishments and it's not uncommon for customers to offer their thanks to him for his service to the country. Marijane Knudsen describes her father as the definition of the word, "patriotic." She says he rarely speaks of his time during the war and grandson, Christopher concurs, adding that he has to drag war stories out of his grandfather. Nonetheless, the awards, citations, and ribbons that Knudsen earned during his time in the South Pacific speak for themselves.

So, the next time you are near Alligerville, take a moment to pop into the little general store and thank this wonderful veteran for the years he dedicated to keeping you and America safe.



Weather Alert – Please Pay Attention!


October 27, 2012

Dear Rochester Resident,

By Sunday afternoon we will be feeling the effects of Hurricane Sandy. This storm is huge and slow-moving and its effects will be felt for a longer period than those of last year’s Tropical Storm Irene. Current forecasts for our area call for tropical storm force winds with heavy rain possibly sometime Monday through Wednesday. The water table is fairly high from recent precipitation. So flooding of rivers and streams as well as localized flooding can be expected. What we don’t know is how severe the flooding will be. We also know that areas known to flood will also flood during this monumental weather event. When and how severe the flooding will be is going to be determined by the amount and rate of rainfall that we receive over the next few days. We strongly recommend that you consider evacuating your residence if it has been known to flood in the past and finding safe shelter with family or friends before storm conditions and flooding make it impossible for you to leave your residence safely. Widespread power outages can also be expected with this storm. Residents with medical conditions requiring electrically operated equipment should also consider evacuation. Current plans call for the following locations to be staffed by 8pm on Monday to accept those residents in need of temporary shelter:

  • Accord Firehouse located on Main Street in Accord
  • Kerhonkson-Accord Rescue Squad Building on Rte 209 in Kerhonkson
  • Alligerville Firehouse located on County Rte 6 in Alligerville
  • Rochester 2 Firehouse located on Samsonville Road in Kerhonkson

We can not guarantee that we will be able to evacuate you if conditions become too severe and ask that you seriously consider leaving early for you and your family’s safety and for the safety of our dedicated emergency personnel.

Keep a watch on conditions and do not wait until the last moment. I will do my best to keep you informed as we plan to staff our Emergency Management Command Center located at the Kerhonkson-Accord Rescue Squad Building by 8pm on Monday or earlier if need be. Please call me (845)-389-0615 or email me at cmc102988@yahoo.com if you have any questions or concerns. We will try to keep our website townofrochester.net as well as my Facebook page updated with pertinent information as best as possible. Emergency requests should be directed dialing 911.

Sincerely,

Carl Chipman
Supervisor
Town of Rochester


Town of Rochester Weather Alert


A very serious storm is forecast to affect us late this weekend and possibly into early next week. A very strong Hurricane is currently of the coast of Florida and is forecast to move up the eastern seaboard. The exact track if the storm is uncertain and will a play a major role in how bad the weather conditions will be. We will be monitoring the storm closely and will brief you with the latest information as we receive it.

  • For safety’s sake, don’t touch or approach any downed wire. Assume it is energized and dangerous. Call Central Hudson immediately Electrical Interruption/ Emergency Phone: 845-452-2700 or 800-527-2714 on the situation, you may also want to call State Police or the Sheriff’s Office to divert traffic until an Central Hudson crew arrives.
  • Maintain a distance of at least 50 feet from downed wires and anything they are in contact with including puddles of water and fences. Supervise your children so that they are not in the vicinity and keep pets on a leash.
  • If a fallen wire is draped over a car, do not approach the car and make rescue attempts. Remain a safe distance away, and try to keep the occupant of the vehicle calm. If possible, emergency personnel should handle the situation.
  • Stock up on non-perishable food, bottled water, manual can opener, baby supplies and pet food. Set your refrigerator and freezer controls to their coldest settings. Fill the bathtub with water.
  • Have emergency equipment within reach – portable radio, flashlights, candles and matches, spare batteries, first aid kit, cell phone and important medications. Update your personal list of emergency phone numbers. Keep Central Hudson’s toll-free number 1-800-527-2714 near the phone to report power outages.
  • If you experience a power outage, don’t assume that Central Hudson automatically knows about it or that someone else will report it. To be sure the outage is reported, please call Central Hudson toll-free at 1-800-527-2714 to let Central Hudson know what happened. The more information you can provide, the more Central Hudson can help you.
  • Remember, if the base station of your cordless phone plugs into the wall, your phone will be unusable during a power outage.
  • If a family member relies on electrically operated medical devices, secure a portable generator or make alternate arrangements for care.
  • Keep at least a half-tank of gas in your car. Consider having extra cash on-hand, in case ATM machines don’t work.
  • Listen for storm alerts on the radio. In case of power outages, Central Hudson will keep the stations updated on repair progress.
  • Learn how to manually open and close any electrically powered garage door, security door or gate.

Please monitor the website townofrochester.net as well as my Facebook page.
I can be reached by email at cmc102988@yahoo.com
My cell number is (845)-389-0615

Let’s be prepared for the worst and hope for the best.

Thank You,

Carl Chipman
Supervisor
Town of Rochester



The Last Week of the Summer Program

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

August 20, 2012 - "Anything Goes Week" was the last week of the Summer Program, which ends on Friday, August 24. The week started with music and so much fun, as "Crazy E the DJ" involved the kids in numerous games, making the last "Lunch with Tana" even more special and enjoyable. Congratulations to all who made this wonderful Summer Program possible... (Thanks for allowing me to take pictures...) See you all in 2013!



Shawangunk Journal – August 16, 2012

Rochester's Wonderful Summer Program

For years as the Town Board Liaison to Rochester's Youth Commission I talked about Summer Programs in arid numbers, boring the limited audience with my attention to details. Now, as a member of the Youth Commission myself, I chose to be a direct participant in some of the department's activities.

This time I won't report on anything, but share impressions from what I personally experienced.

I'm not sure people know how many programs and events are organized by Town of Rochester's Recreation and Youth Department lead by the passionate Director Carol Dennin and Valerie Weaver, her assistant. The events are listed in a quarterly newsletter found at the Town Hall, Community Center, local banks, etc. An additional, extremely informative Summer Schedule details what's going on every single day, Monday to Friday, July 9 to August 24.

Monday's special mark is the "Lunch with Tana." Meat balls, nuggets, tacos all served with healthy vegetables are delicious. Gail Agostaro and Alice Gray are helping Tana Miller, Chef Extraordinaire.

On August 6, even with Tana vacationing, the weekly "Lunch with Tana" kept being excellent! In fact, the whole day was a symphony of colors. After lunch, the kids enjoyed face painting, creating colorful beads jewelry, and painting carnival masks.

On August 8, I joined a field trip to the State Museum in Albany. I chaperoned two adorable little girls, Angel (6) and Emily (7), and enjoyed immensely exploring the Museum through their eyes... Art, science, dioramas, Native American scenes, carousel rides, an old subway car, the pool and fountains in the Plaza and, of course, the gift shop! I realized the importance of the World Trade Center display for those born after 9/11, even if they may not understand everything now... Great experience overall. Thanks and congratulations to Maryann Gates, the Summer Program director, whose calm, precision, organizing skills and care for kids are outstanding.

All these events were a rich display of joy, colors, fun, but mostly of tender loving care for our town's youngest generation. If you are not familiar with Rochester's Recreation and Youth Department's activities, grab a newsletter or call 626-2115. Please consider the future Summer Programs, they offer the best care at the lowest cost possible (efforts are made to offer scholarships to kids in need — I remember a mother telling me how this program saved the summer for her and her daughter).

The Youth Commission needs volunteer members, please consider joining. For me, being a Youth Commission member proved already to be extremely rewarding.

Manuela Michailescu
Town of Rochester Youth Commission member



A Field Trip to the Albany State Museum

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

August 8, 2012 – I was happy to join the group of Rochester "reds" and chaperone two adorable little girls, Angel (6) and Emily (7). I did enjoy immensely exploring the museum through their eyes... Art, science, dioramas, Native American scenes, carousel rides, an old subway car, the pool and fountains in the Plaza and, of course, the gift shop! I realized the importance of the World Trade Center display for those born after 9/11, even if they may not understand everything now... Great experience overall. Thanks and congratulations to Maryann Gates, the Summer Program director.



Colors of Rochester's Summer Program

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

August 6, 2012 – With oven-warm tacos, salad, tomatoes, and many extras (meat or cheese?) – prepared and offered by Gail Agostaro and Alice Gray – the weekly "Lunch with Tana" proved to be excellent even... without Tana being present!

The colorful lunch was followed by more colorful activities. The kids enjoyed face painting, creating colorful turkeys, and painting carnival masks...



Another great Lunch with Tana

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

July 23, 2012 – Colorful and healthy vegetable choices, super-delicious chicken nuggets, chocolate pudding... just some of the specials prepared by Tana Miller and Alice Gray.

Outdoors or inside, kids participating in the Town of Rochester's summer program definitely have fun!



Summer Program begins with Lunch with Tana

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

July 9, 2012 – The Summer Program of Town of Rochester's Recreation/Youth Department started today featuring a "Lunch with Tana" (Tana Miller, Chef Extraordinaire). Helping Tana with the weekly lunches (every Monday) are Gail Agostaro and Alice Gray. The Summer Program, which includes various events and trips, continues till August 24. For more information call 626-2115.



Memorial Day parade followed Veterans Park ceremony

Photography by Manuela Michailescu and Jessica Knapp

May 28, 2012 – Town Board and Youth Commission members rode on the float decorated with the beautiful hand-made signs created by the kids.



"Wear a Hat" Mother's Day Brunch

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

May 11, 2012 – To honor the mom in all of us beautiful women, we were invited to this Annual Mother's Day event. The brunch was free to all moms... as long as they wore a hat! Prizes for the most creative hats have been awarded.



Annual Easter Egg Hunt

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

April 17, 2012 - The Annual Easter Egg Hunt took place at the Rochester Town Park. The event was organized by age groups. Easter Bunny was hopping as a special guest!



St. Patrick's Day Luncheon

Manuela Michailescu

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

March 16, 2012 - the delicious and very well attended Annual Corned Beef and Cabbage Luncheon to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. People wearing the green enjoyed a delicious lunch and the camaraderie of new and old friends.



First Town Board meeting in 2012

Manuela Michailescu

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

January 5, 2012 – Former Councilwoman Manuela Michailescu, whose 4-year term ended December 31, 2011, receives an award plaque from Town Supervisor Carl Chipman "In Recognition of dedicated service to the Town of Rochester as a Town Councilwoman."



The Haunted Barn — 13th Edition...

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

After jokingly forecasting "dark and scary" weather for October 29 — the initial date for the Haunting Barn event — the Recreation and Community Department re-scheduled the 13th Haunted Barn for November 4, because of the snow storm!



Abby's first scarecrow...

Photography by Kandy Santosky

Halloween 2011. Meet Abby and Sierra, a/k/a Strawberry Shortcake and Ballerina Butterfly.



Trick or Treat?

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Organized by the Recreation and Community Department, the annual Children's Halloween Party took place on Friday, October 28, right before the snow storm.



Roaring Twenties Luncheon

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

October 13, 2011 — Town of Rochester's Recreation and Community Department organized a Roaring Twenties luncheon graced with an Olde Memory Lane perfomance by the pianist Jimmy "Jazz" Flanigan.

Mr. Jimmy Flanigan inherited his musical talent from his grandfather, James J. and his father Eddy D., who toured with his dance band across America in the 1920's. As a drummer, Jimmy sat in with the bands of Louis Armstrong, Jack Teagarten, and performed with popular bands in England and Germany. Jimmy honors the memory of his father through his focus on music of the 1920s and 30s.

The performance was enjoyed by the enchanted audience in the packed Community Center; Town Supervisor Carl Chipman, Town Councilwoman Manuela Michailescu — Liaison to the Youth Commission, Recreation Department Director Carol Dennin, Assistant Director Valerie Weaver, Youth Commission Chair Jessica Knapp and Vice Chair Pam Stocking were also present.



Rochester Archives' Day

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

October 8, 2011 — Treasures of our local history displayed at the Town of Rochester Town Hall.



Fifth Annual Christian Heritage Day

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

October 8, 2011 — Children reciting The Pledge of Allegiance during the Fifth Annual Christian Heritage Day at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Kerhonkson.



Heritage Day and Pumpkin Festival

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

October 1, 2011 — Despite the wether, the Heritage Day and Pumpkin Festival — organized by Friends of Historic Rochester — was a success.



Seventh Annual Jennie Bell Festival

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

September 24, 2011 — Seventh Annual Jennie Bell Pie Festival took place at Kelder's Farm in Accord. One of the highlights was the Youth Talent Show — organized by the Town of Rochester's Recreation Department.



Olde Memory Lane Concert

September 16, 2011 — At the Accord Firehouse, Friends of Historic Rochester Annual Meeting featured a special program — "Olde Memory Lane Concert" — offered by Jimmy "Jazz" Flanigan.



Palentown Schoolhouse Museum

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

August 27, 2011 — Chick Logan and Gary Miller shared their love for history with Town of Rochester Councilwoman Manuela Michailescu during her visit to the Palentown Schoolhouse Museum (located on Palentown Road — off Samsonville Road — in Kerhonkson).

A schoolhouse may have been built on this site, as early as the 1830s. A deed dated 1851 refers to the property as Philip's Meadow and leases it to the common school district #10. According to family members, the present building was constructed by Horace Dymond in the mid 1860s on land donated by the family. In September 1988, the schoolhouse was designated a State and National historic landmark. The 300-pound school bell, still remains in place on the roof. The window shutters replicate the design of a shutter found in the woodshed attic.



A Memorable Ceremony

May 30, 2011 — The Historic Preservation Commission of the Town of Rochester held a short ceremony at the Veterans Park (down from the Town Hall) on Memorial Day.



New Legislative Districts

After contentious meetings and some eight versions of the map, the Reapportionment Commission adopted the new legislative districting plan (below).

Town of Rochester and East Wawarsing now constitute
Legislative District 21.



Earth Day 2011

Photography by Jacob Chipman

Dr. Diana Puglisi-Cilenti, Councilman Tavi Cilenti, Councilwoman Manuela Michailescu, Councilman Tony Spano and Town of Rochester Supervisor Carl Chipman celebrated Earth Day 2011 by cleaning Lucas Avenue in Accord.



Caturday, April 16, 2011

Photography by Jacob Chipman

Town of Rochester, Caturday, April 16, 2011 — Under the close supervision of Dr. Diana Puglisi-Cilenti (left), Town Board members Tavi Cilenti, Manuela Michailescu, Tony Spano and Carl Chipman rescued the big yellow cat lost in thoughts on Lucas Avenue in Accord.



Rochester Historic Farmstead Survey

Commissioned by the Historic Preservation Commission, the survey of ten historic farmsteads in the Town of Rochester is the most in-depth document ever produced about town’s 330-year history of farming.

On April 15, preservationist Neil Larson (above) presented his findings in a very successful illustrated talk at the Rochester Reformed Church in Accord.

By following the links below (click on photos or the farms' names), you can download the ten Historic Farmstead Inventory Forms, each a useful reference for understanding the significance of our historic farms and agricultural history.

1) Thomas S. Schoonmaker Farm — 607 County Route 6

This farmstead is an example of an early 19th-century farmstead with an intact wood frame house decorated in the Greek Revival style, a compound of farm buildings including a barn and attached cow house and granary, wagon house, poultry house and other secondary buildings, as well as a lock tender’s shanty moved from a nearby site on the Delaware & Hudson Canal. The farmstead contains more than 100 acres of land on the floodplain on the north side of the Rondout Creek that has been in continuous cultivation since the 18th century, if not earlier. The property maintains physical integrity from its historic period (1750-1920) and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive 19th-century buildings. It appears to be individually eligible for the National Register but is also a component of a potential rural historic district with other historic farms in the Kyserike neighborhood including the hamlet of Alligerville.

2) Alliger-Davenport Farm — 10 Garden Lane

This farmstead is the only one of the ten properties documented that no longer retains any of its associated farmland, which has been absorbed into the neighboring Joachim Schoonmaker Farm (#3) or subdivided into residential building lots. The stone house, built c. 1800 is a distinctive late example of the type with its dressed stone walls and symmetrical facades. Among the remaining farm buildings are an important model barn 12 erected in 1911 and a large poultry house. The surviving farmstead has physical integrity from its historic period (1800-1950) and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive buildings. It appears to be individually eligible for the National Register but is also a component of a potential rural historic district with the neighboring Joachim Schoonmaker Farm (#3) and other farms in the Accord neighborhood.

3) Joachim Schoonmaker/Saunderskill Farm — 41 Garden Lane

This 300-acre farmstead located on the south side of the Rondout Creek is an active farm that has been in continuous cultivation by nine generations of the same family for nearly 300 years (as such, it has been recognized as a Century Farm by the New York Agricultural Society). The earliest building is a two-story brick-fronted stone house constructed in 1787, replacing an earlier house. There is a barn and secondary buildings dating in the 19th century, as well as early 20th-century features, such as a model cow barn and poultry houses. Numerous greenhouses and other buildings have been erected more recently. The historic period spans from 1730 to 1960, or within 50 years of the present. The property maintains physical integrity from its historical period and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive domestic and agricultural buildings. It appears to be individually eligible for the National Register but is also a component of a potential rural historic district with the neighboring Alliger – Davenport Farm (#2) and other historic farms in the Accord neighborhood.

4) Appeldoorn Farm — 4938 Route 209

This 140-acre farmstead on the north side of Route 209 east of Accord is comprised of two 18th-century farms (one in ruins) that were combined in the 1930s to create a country retreat for descendants of the Schoonmaker family who founded one of the farms in the 18th century. The earliest building is a story-and-a-half stone house constructed in 1756 for Benjamin and Catrina Schoonmaker, which was renovated and enlarged in 1937 by Kingston architect Myron S. Teller, a master of Colonial Revival ―restorations‖ of historic stone houses. Teller also designed a Game House for his client, Howard C. Sykes, a big game hunter. It was a replica of an 18th-century stone house using stones salvaged from the DeWitt homestead that stood in ruins on the adjacent property, which Sykes had bought to enlarge his holding. A working barn, poultry house and other farm buildings also exist on the site, along with meadows and pasture land providing a picturesque setting. The historic period spans from 1720 to 1960, or within 50 years of the present. The property maintains physical integrity from its historical period and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive domestic and agricultural buildings and for the masterful design work of architect Myron S. Teller. It appears to be individually eligible for the National Register but also may be a component of a potential rural historic district with other historic farms north of Accord, such as the Alliger – Davenport Farm (#2) and the Joachim Schoonmaker Farm (#3).

5) Krom-Rosenkrans Farm — 234 Airport Road

This farmstead is an example of a mid-18th-century farmstead with recently restored stone house, an expanded Dutch barn with attached cow house and 90 acres of land on an upland plateau on the north side of the Rondout Valley. The property maintains physical integrity from its historic period (1750-1960) or within 50 years of the present and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive buildings. It appears to be individually eligible for the National Register but is also a component of a potential rural historic district with other historic farms in the Whitfield neighborhood. Some of the houses in this neighborhood, such as the Hornbeck and Depuy stone houses on Whitfield Road, already are listed on the National Register and would be contributing components of a larger rural historic district.

6) Kelder-Rider-DeWitt / Domino Farm — 244 Airport Road

This farmstead is an example of a mid-18th-century farmstead with a late-19th-century wood frame house, an expanded Dutch barn and 100 acres of land on an upland plateau on the north side of the Rondout Valley. The property maintains physical integrity from its historic period (1750-1960), or within 50 years of the present and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive buildings. It appears to be eligible for the National Register as a component of a potential rural historic district with other historic farms in the Whitfield neighborhood (see #5 above).

7) Osterhoudt Home Farm — 167 Lower Whitfield Road

This farmstead is an example of an early-18th-century farmstead containing one of the oldest stone houses in the town. It was the home farm of the Osterhoudt family and probably was the site where Teunis Osterhoudt established his homestead in the 17th century. The farm contains an altered Dutch barn and 37 acres of land on an upland plateau on the north side of the Rondout Valley. It was one of at least four lots divided and distributed among the heirs of Cornelius Osterhoudt in 1794. The property maintains physical integrity from its historic period (1720-1946) and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive buildings. It appears to be individually eligible for the National Register but also is a component of a potential rural historic district with the Schoonmaker – Rider Farm (#8) and the Kelder Farm (#9) as well as other historic farms in the Mettacahonts neighborhood.

8) Schoonmaker-Rider Farm — 161 Lower Whitfield Road

This farmstead is an example of a late-18th-century farmstead with a small, story-and-a-half stone house, early 19th-century barn with attached cow house, and 60 acres of land on an upland plateau on the north side of the Rondout Valley. The property maintains physical integrity from its historic period (1780-1960), or within 50 years of the present and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive buildings. It appears to be eligible for the National Register as a component of a potential rural historic district with the Osterhoudt 14 Home Farm (#7) and the Kelder Farm (#9) as well as other historic farms in the Mettacahonts neighborhood.

9) Kelder Farm — 12 Pine Tree Lane

This farmstead is an example of a late-18th-century farmstead with a small, story-and-a-half stone house, substantial masonry poultry house, and 65 acres of land on an upland plateau on the north side of the Rondout Valley. The property maintains physical integrity from its historic period (1780-1960), or within 50 years of the present and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive buildings. It appears to be eligible for the National Register as a component of a potential rural historic district with the Osterhoudt Home Farm (#7) and the Schoonmaker – Rider Farm (#8) as well as other historic farms in the Mettacahonts neighborhood.

10) Hornbeck-Davis / Arrowhead Farm — 5941 Route 209

This 350-acre farmstead located on the north side of the Rondout Creek is an active farm that has been in continuous cultivation since the early 1700s. It comprises two historic farms and part of a third. The earliest building is a story-and-a-half stone house with portions dating at least to the 1760s. There is an 18th-century Dutch barn and other farm buildings erected in the 19th century, as well as 20th-century features, such as cow houses, poultry houses, machinery sheds, and tenant dwellings. The historic period spans from 1760 to 1960, or within 50 years of the present. The property maintains physical integrity from its historical period and meets National Register criteria A and C for its association with the agricultural history of the town and for its distinctive domestic and agricultural buildings. It appears to be individually eligible for the National Register but is also a component of a potential rural historic district with other historic farms stretching across the Rondout Creek south of Accord.



Rochester's Annual Valentine Luncheon

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

Accord, February 11, 2011 — Town of Rochester's Annual Valentine Luncheon honored Mary Lee, who is retiring from the Youth Commission after many years of dedicated service to the community.

In the group photo, Mary Lee is surrounded by members of the Youth Commission and Youth Department. From left: Councilwoman Manuela Michailescu (Town Board Liaison to the YC), Pamela Stocking (Vice Chair, YC), Juliette Graham-Hayes, Susan Matson, Mary Lee, Susan Bruck, Jessica Knapp (Chair, YC), Valerie Weaver (Assistant Director, Youth Department), Carol Dennin (Director, Youth Department).

Town of Rochester Supervisor Carl Chipman and Rondout Valley School District Superintendent Rosario Agostaro attended the luncheon.



Happy Thanksgiving!

The First Thanksgiving – painting by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris



Fifth Annual Christmas Tree Lighting

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Accord, November 19, 2010 — Everyone was invited to the Christmas Tree Lighting at the Town Hall. All enjoyed the carols, cookies and hot chocolate.



Veterans Park Dedication

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

Accord, November 11, 2010 — The Historic Preservation Commission and the Rochester Town Board hosted the new Veterans Park dedication on Veterans Day. After the ceremony, all participants were invited at the Town Hall for refreshments.



Kids' Halloween Party

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Accord, October 29, 2010 — Lots of Halloween fun at the Community Center...



The Haunted Barn

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

Accord, October 23, 2010 — The Youth Department produced the event that scared the wits out of the Town of Rochester.



Veterans Park Is Taking Shape

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Accord, October 14, 2010 — The future Veterans Park is located down the hill from the Town Hall. The Historic Preservation Commission and the Rochester Town Board are inviting all residents to the Veterans Park dedication on Veterans Day, November 11, 2010 at 1:00 pm. Refreshments will be served.



Bewitching Italian Luncheon

Photography by Jon Dogar-Marinesco

Accord, October 14, 2010 — Special guests at the luncheon held at the Town Community Center were Ed and Doris Lamon — celebrating their 60th Anniversary!



Barley Store Is History

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Accord, October 7, 2010 — The dilapidated building at Main Street and Scenic Road was demolished.



Heritage Day and Pumpkin Festival

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Accord, October 2, 2010 — Friends of Historic Rochester hosted a day of fun and entertainment on the Museum's back lawn.



The 6th Annual Jennie Bell Pie Festival

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Accord, September 25, 2010 — Organized by the Kerhonkson-Accord Chamber of Commerce, the 6th Annual Jennie Bell Pie Festival took place — from noon until dusk — at Kelder's Farm on Route 209.



Fourth Annual Christian Heritage Day

Photography by Manuela Michailescu

Kerhonkson, September 25, 2010 — Town of Rochester Supervisor Carl Chipman speaks at a celebration of our Christian heritage.



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Do not worry if you have built your castles in the air. They are where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

— Henry David Thoreau

Dutch Vernacular Architecture in North America

"Dutch Vernacular Architecture in North America, 1640-1830
is a significant contribution to architectural history and our understanding of the early Dutch settlers.
It is an indispensable guide to those restoring early Dutch houses."

— Dr. Natalie Naylor
Prof. Emerita, Hofstra University

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